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HomeBeefVIDEO: Could Rani be the world’s smallest cow?
Catherina Cunnane
Catherina Cunnanehttps://www.thatsfarming.com/
Catherina Cunnane hails from a sixth-generation drystock and specialised pedigree suckler enterprise in Co. Mayo. She currently holds the positions of editor and general manager at That's Farming, having joined the firm during its start-up phase in 2015.
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VIDEO: Could Rani be the world’s smallest cow?

A farmer in Bangladesh has claimed that they own the world’s smallest cow.

According to Shikor Agro Industries Limited, Rani, a Bhutti or Bhutanese cow, is 20 inches in height (51-centimetres) and weighs 26kgs.

Rani resides on a farm in Charigram, 30 kms south-west of Dhaka.

The farmer confirmed that it has submitted an application to the Guinness World Records.

In a post on social media, a farm spokesperson said: “All of you know that the world’s smallest cow is the queen in our roots in Agro, which we believe will soon make a place in the Guinness Book of World Records.”

It is understood that the Guinness World Records will come to a conclusion in three months.

World’s shortest cow

According to the Guinness World Records, Manikyam, is currently the world’s shortest cow, standing at 61.6 cm or 24.07 in.

Ashkay N.V, who farms in Kerala, India, owns the Vechur cow, the current titleholder.

The breed is well-known for producing dwarf cows and tends to grow to a maximum height of approximately 90cm.

Vet, Dr E M Muhammed, told Guinness World Records that he believes the state’s “unusual” climatic conditions may have a link with the production of such short cows.

He said, “it is hot and particularly humid here, and we believe this has an effect on the height of our cattle”.

Could Molly be Ireland’s oldest cow?

Meanwhile, last month, we reported that a 24-year-old Hereford-cross-Angus could be one of Ireland’s oldest cows.

The cow, which has had seventeen calves to date, resides on the farm of Tony Henchy in Derrycarne, Doonbeg in Co Clare.

“She is right up there with the oldest, or so they are telling me at the registration. She was my dad’s initially. He passed away, and I decided to hold onto her so she could end her days here with me,” Tony told the Clare Echo.

Molly was born on the Henchy farm, and her mother hailed from the Killimer area. The farmer credits her longevity with being from west Clare stock.

Read more about Molly.

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