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Wool in School: McCormack on mission to educate children about the benefits of wool

Lorna McCormack from Co. Meath runs her own business called Wool in School, alongside rearing a family of four children.

Wool in School is a unique education resource for schools and wool enthusiasts to educate on the uses of locally produced wool and alpaca fibre.

She aims to bridge the gap between the understanding of the sustainable use of wool and the impact it will have on communities and the world.

Wool in School

Lorna has always been interested in wool properties and benefits ever since she learned how to knit in school in the 1980s.

She comes from a heritage of Irish craftswomen who worked with wool as a craft of family necessity.

“As an eco-educator, I believe it is important that children learn about the properties and benefits of wool on the environment,” she told That’s Farming.

“In our workshops, students can touch different wool, try carding, spinning on a drop spindle and weaving on an Ashford Loom.”

Background

Lorna’s background is in social care. “I worked for many years with deaf children.”

During those years, she self-published many books and resources for parents with deaf children and offered an education pathway for, accessing Irish sign language for deaf children.

Building blocks

Lorna established her new business, as she felt schools needed more awareness about the benefits of a fibre we have in Ireland.

“Children are so involved in learning about climate change; I believe wool has its place in this conversation.”

Wool in School is for people aged from 4-104, which is perfect for schools, creches, museums, venues and so much more.

Importance of wool

Lorna feels it is important to share insights into the uses of wool for the next generation. Showing people the exciting uses of wool is vital as we move to a sustainable and eco-friendly environment.

Wool in School brings children an understanding of a heritage that has moulded the uses of wool today. Children reflect on the past, present and future of wool.

Also, they will have the opportunity to explore the benefits of wool and how it can be used in our future with technology and suitability.

Lorna feels that wool holds a place in this vital change with the support of various Irish mills and businesses.

Supporting Irish

Fibre artis is the natural fibre, she uses to create her wool sculptures. Lorna tries to source her wool from Irish farmers.

She understands the environmental usage of wool and the process of creating fine wool through her relationship with alpaca and sheep farmers.

She was given a greater understanding of creating wool from the Irish and European mills, which has given her in-depth knowledge on the uses of wool.

Future

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, Lorna was not able to deliver the workshops to schools.

The business has tailored to the online with the wool awareness programme, which is available to schools and wool enthusiasts to download online.

Each school will receive a free textile goodie bag and lanolin, this is an ideal opportunity to explore Irish wool and heritage at the Cushendale Woollen Mills, in Co Kilkenny.

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