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HomeFarming NewsMy herd has gone down with TB - what happens next?
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My herd has gone down with TB – what happens next?

In this video, a Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) spokesperson explains what happens after your herd has tested positive for TB.

With 3% of herd going down with TB in any given year, the Department has made a series of videos to create clarity around the process of removing TB from your farm, and what they will do to help.

Reactors in your herd

Once reactors are found in your herd, there are several steps taken by the DAFM to eradicate TB. The DAFM spokesperson outlines the procedure for managing the reactor cattle on your farm:

  1.  The vet inserts a reactor tag into the ears of all the reactor cattle;
  2.  Further blood testing will be needed in the following week or two;
  3.  Reactors must be isolated from the rest of the herd to prevent the spread of disease further through the herd;
  4.  Discard milk from dairy cow reactors (a record of this must be kept);
  5.  Any medications administered to reactor cattle must be reported to the department vet;
  6.  No movements in and out of herd will be allowed, unless animals are sent direct to slaughter;
  7.  If more than 2 reactors in the herd, a department appointed vet will visit. They will inspect reactors, blood test them and investigate how they contracted TB;
  8.  While this is happening, the DAFM is working to remove the reactor animals from the farm as soon as possible, once a valuation is agreed with the farmer;
  9. A TAO will ensure you get a permit to remove the animals and a department-appointed haulier will collect them.

What now?

After reactors are gone, you want to reduce your risk of any residual TB on your farm by cleaning and disinfecting. The Department spokesperson proposes to use the TB-approved disinfectants, clean properly and disinfect properly. Department inspectors will check to make sure cleaning was carried out to required standard.

After all reactors are removed from your farm:

  • You’ll need 2 successive clear tests before your herd is clear to trade again;
  • Tests are at 60-day intervals;
  • Once you have two clear tests in succession, you will be derestricted;
  • Twice-a-year testing after derestriction for a period of time.

Image source: Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine YouTube

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